Posts about .NET Core

How ListSeparator Depends on Runtime and Operating System



This blog post was originally posted on JetBrains .NET blog.

In the two previous blog posts from this series, we discussed how socket errors and socket orders depend on the runtime and operating systems. For some, it may be obvious that some things are indeed specific to the operating system or the runtime, but often these issues come as a surprise and are only discovered when running our code on different systems. An interesting example that may bite us at runtime is using ListSeparator in our code. It should give us a common separator for list elements in a string. But is it really common? Let's start our investigation by printing ListSeparator for the Russian language:

Console.WriteLine(new CultureInfo("ru-ru").TextInfo.ListSeparator);

On Windows, you will get the same result for .NET Framework, .NET Core, and Mono: the ListSeparator is ; (a semicolon). You will also get a semicolon on Mono+Unix. However, on .NET Core+Unix, you will get a non-breaking space.

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How Sorting Order Depends on Runtime and Operating System



This blog post was originally posted on JetBrains .NET blog.

In Rider, we have unit tests that enumerate files in your project and dump a sorted list of these files. In one of our test projects, we had the following files: jquery-1.4.1.js, jquery-1.4.1.min.js, jquery-1.4.1-vsdoc.js. On Windows, .NET Framework, .NET Core, and Mono produce the same sorted list:

jquery-1.4.1.js
jquery-1.4.1.min.js
jquery-1.4.1-vsdoc.js

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How Socket Error Codes Depend on Runtime and Operating System



This blog post was originally posted on JetBrains .NET blog.

Rider consists of several processes that send messages to each other via sockets. To ensure the reliability of the whole application, it's important to properly handle all the socket errors. In our codebase, we had the following code which was adopted from Mono Debugger Libs and helps us communicate with debugger processes:

protected virtual bool ShouldRetryConnection (Exception ex, int attemptNumber)
{
    var sx = ex as SocketException;
    if (sx != null) {
        if (sx.ErrorCode == 10061) //connection refused
            return true;
    }
    return false;
}

In the case of a failed connection because of a “ConnectionRefused” error, we are retrying the connection attempt. It works fine with .NET Framework and Mono. However, once we migrated to .NET Core, this method no longer correctly detects the "connection refused" situation on Linux and macOS. If we open the SocketException documentation, we will learn that this class has three different properties with error codes:

  • SocketError SocketErrorCode: Gets the error code that is associated with this exception.
  • int ErrorCode: Gets the error code that is associated with this exception.
  • int NativeErrorCode: Gets the Win32 error code associated with this exception.
What's the difference between these properties? Should we expect different values on different runtimes or different operating systems? Which one should we use in production? Why do we have problems with ShouldRetryConnection on .NET Core? Let's figure it all out!

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.NET Core performance revolution in Rider 2020.1



This blog post was originally posted on JetBrains .NET blog.

Many Rider users may know that the IDE has two main processes: frontend (Java-application based on the IntelliJ platform) and backend (.NET-application based on ReSharper). Since the first release of Rider, we’ve used Mono as the backend runtime on Linux and macOS. A few years ago, we decided to migrate to .NET Core. After resolving hundreds of technical challenges, we are finally ready to present the .NET Core edition of Rider!

In this blog post, we want to share the results of some benchmarks that compare the Mono-powered and the .NET Core-powered editions of Rider. You may find this interesting if you are also thinking about migrating to .NET Core, or if you just want a high-level overview of the improvements to Rider in terms of performance and footprint, following the migration. (Spoiler: they’re huge!)

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